Constituents of GVA in the Border, Midland and West regions, 2012

Looking in more detail at the regional GVA figures for 2012 it is interesting to examine the share of GVA coming from each major economic branch and how this has varied over time and in each NUTS 3 region.

There was very little change in the share of GVA from the three major branches or sectors (Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing; Manufacturing, Building and Construction; and Market and Non Market services) in the BMW region for 2012 as compared to 2011. The importance of the different shares is illustrated in Figure 1 below for the BMW as a whole and then for each of its constituent regions.

Figure 1: GVA from Major BranchesBMW branch GVA

Border GVAMidland GVAWest GVA

Source: CSO, 2015, County Incomes and Regional GDP 2012, Table 16

Manufacturing is much more significant in the West region (40.2% of GVA) than in with Border or Midland regions, while Services are more significant in the Midland region (77.3%), and Agriculture is slightly more important in the Border region (3.4%).

In GVA terms, Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing share is still marginally more significant in the BMW (2.6% of GVA in 2012 up on 2.5% in 2011) than in the S&E (1.3% in 2012, down from 1.4% in 2011). This is down from 7.2% (for BMW) of GVA (2.4% S&E) in 2000.

Although GVA from Agriculture declined (with some fluctuation) in all three of the Border, Midland and West regions between 2003 and 2009, since then there has been growth in the GVA from this branch, with Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing in the Border region almost back to the same value as in 2003, while in the West GVA from Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing is greater than in 2003. In the Midland output from this branch has performed less well and in 2012 was still below the 2003 level (see Figure 2 below).

Figure 2: GVA from Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing in Border, Midland and West regions 2003-2012

Ag GVA

Source: CSO, 2015, County Incomes and Regional GDP 2012, Table 15,18

The decline in construction and building has affected the output from the Manufacturing, Building and Construction in the Border and Midland regions. In contrast, despite a slight dip between 2008 and 2009 in this sector in the West this branch has shown very significant growth (most likely because of manufacturing) and has performed very strongly since 2009. Since then the West region has had a higher output from this branch than the Border region (Figure 3 below).

Figure 3: GVA from Manufacturing, Building and Construction in Border, Midland and West regions 2003-2012

Manufac GVA

Source: CSO, 2015, County Incomes and Regional GDP 2012, Table 15,18

Finally, in all of the three regions Services has shown a steady growth between 2003 and 2007, with a slight decline since then, although growth in this branch in the West region resumed since 2010.

Figure 4: GVA from Market and Non Market Services in Border, Midland and West regions 2003-2012

services GVA

Source: CSO, 2015, County Incomes and Regional GDP 2012, Table 15,18

The value of GVA services branch/ sector in all three regions is greater than that for either of the other two major branches and has shown less volatility than the other branches.

A short report on the CSO publication ‘County Incomes and regional GDP, 2012’ will be published by the WDC in July.

 

Helen McHenry

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About WDC Insights

WDC Insights is the blog of the Western Development Commission Policy Analysis Team. The WDC Policy Analysis team analyses regional and rural issues, suggests solutions to regional difficulties and provides a regional perspective on national policy objectives. Policy Analysis Team Members are: Deirdre Frost, Helen McHenry and Pauline White. We will all be posting here. You can contact us here, or use our firstnamelastname at wdc.ie Follow us on Twitter @WDCInsights
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